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Calf Scramble

The Program & Sponsors

During the PRCA Rodeos held at the 2016 Tulsa State Fair, FFA & 4-H members had the chance to “catch a calf.” Ten lucky winners received an $800.00 certificate to use towards a purchase of an animal to show at the 2017 Tulsa State Fair. The goal of the Calf Scramble is for exhibitors to gain knowledge about the care of animals. Exhibitors will learn animal husbandry, time management, and even financial responsibility. Participants have up until May 1, to locate and purchase an aminal. Each participant is responsible for sending monthly progress and expense reports to the Calf Scramble Committee.  

This program allows youth who are unable to purchase an animal on their own the opportunity to show at the Tulsa State Fair. Thank you to the sponsors of the 2016 - 2017 Calf Scramble!

We hope you enjoy reading the monthly progress reports.  These students are excited and appreciative to have the opportunity to show a heifer at the 2017 Tulsa State Fair!

Monthly Reports

July 2017 Reports

Merideth Behrens- Colbert FFA

June has been a busy month for me attending summer camps and making preparations for Shorthorn Jr. Nationals in Tulsa.  When I wasn’t attending a camp, I was putting in the time and working with my calf scramble heifer.  I make it a daily routine to rinse twice a day, especially when the summer heat gets to be unbearable.  When I bring in the calves from the night runs, they all know where to go and which pen they need to go to in the barn.  Once they make it to their pen, I shut the gate and place the halter on them and take off to the wash rack.  I condition there hide with Maine and Tail Conditioner.  Then place them under the fans for an hour of standing.  I will work the calves hair with a blower, brush, and comb.    After an hour of working hair, I place the calves back into their pens for feeding.  While I have them tied I catch myself singing or talking to the calves.  Mystic Jalynn has a unique personality and she has a gentle disposition, which makes her unique compared to my other show heifers.   I usually go back out to the barn later in the afternoon and start the process over again.  Once they are eating I let them out to the night runs for exercise.

I have been keeping tract how much I feed Jalynn to keep her from getting to over-condition prior to breeding.  Right now she gets a heavier diet of fiber consisting of Natural Fill and cotton seed hulls with minimal concentration of sweet feed.  Mystic Jaylnn weighed 844 on July 4, 2017 and she gained 88 lbs.  over 31 days, which is 2.83 average daily gain.  That is still a very exceptional daily gain going into the summer months.  I suspect Jaylnn’s daily gain will decrease during the hot summer days.

Besides showing cattle at the Shorthorn Jr. Nationals, I participate in other contest such as showmanship, arts and crafts, livestock judging, and beef cook off.  In the arts and craft contest, I did cut out a blue roan shorthorn calf from a blue roan hide and placed the cutout on a stuff pillow I sewed together. The project took me a couple days to complete, the hardest part was cutting out the show calf from remanence of cow hides.  It’s not every day you see a blue roan calf on a stuff pillow.

I did take my heifer to get her feet trimmed at the end of May, and her toes were in good shape, a little long.  I didn’t see any signs of foot rot or cracks in her toes.  I work at conditioning her toes everyday by using Hooflex, which helps soften her hooves to keep them from cracking.  The foot trimmer said Jalynn’s toes were growing right and were very healthy.

In closing, the month of July is Jr. Nationals and I can’t wait to show Jalynn.  It will be a good test to see where she stands on a national level.  I feel she has a good opportunity to compete towards the top end of her class.   She ties together very good from a skeletal standpoint and keeps a very attractive look.  For this time of year, Jalynn has a very good hair coat which can be contributed to her genetics.  In next month’s report, hopefully I will have good news about her placing.

Chet Cundiff- Perkins-Tryon FFA

This summer has gone by so fast! It seems like the only thing I remember is time spent with my goats. It has been pretty hot in July, so it seems like all the goats want to do is lay in the shade. I wouldn’t mind that myself, but I still needed to get them out and work with them. I get them out in the evenings when it’s a little cooler so I could put the show halters on and walk them. I have also been working on bracing them and building muscle. To build muscle I make them run. The most fun way to get them to run, is to get them to chase me. I like to walk away from the pen a pretty good distance and then turn them loose. I wait until they are distracted, eating grass, and I take off! They beat me back to the pen every time, but it’s a lot of fun! Playing chase has gotten me in better shape too. We get some good laughs out of it. After I work with them a while I put them up and feed them and give fresh water. Since it has been so hot, they have been drinking more water, but eating less food. I still give them about a pound each, but sometimes they have leftovers when I go out in the morning or afternoon.

The goats did get a break this month because we went on a vacation for a week. I have some really good neighbors that live around the corner, and they took good care of Bonnie, Clyde, and Barney. I showed them how much to feed and asked them to keep the water fresh. My neighbors have goats and horses and chickens, so they know what they are doing and took great care of my goats. It was good to get back home and see them! It was the first thing I did when I got home.

My cousin John came up this month to check on the goats and see if they need anything. He showed us how to trim their hooves and we wormed them again. He said we should worm them every month. We had left over wormer from last month, so we didn’t have to buy any more. We also had feed all month since we stocked up in June. I didn’t have any expenses this month because we had leftovers of everything from June.

Again I would like to say thank you to the sponsors. This has been a really great experience!

Trey Reece Perkins-Tryon FFA/Perkins 4-H

This past month was Sooner State Dairy Show in Stillwater, Oklahoma.  It is dairy cattle show that has a long tradition in our state.  The first day we got there Kanika had a swollen foot.  I gave her 5cc of Draxin and the next day her swelling went down.  That evening a vet that we use often came to check a friend’s heifer that was sick.  She looked at Kanika also.  The vet said she had a non-contagious skin disease.  Kanika went on to place 3rd in her class out of 6 heifers.  When preparing for the show she was easy to handle.  She is a very large heifer that could cause lots of problems, but she was just as gentle as our smallest Jersey calf.  She was so well behaved when we clipped her and groomed for the show.  I think she enjoyed the attention.

I had a very good show at Sooner State.  My Holstein cow was champion.  We had several Jerseys “in the hunt” for champion junior jersey.  Some of my other accomplishments include: high individual dairy judging, 1st place FFA dairy judging team, 3rd place quiz bowl team, 3rd place skill-a-thon and high individual in the judging sweepstakes.  May favorite accomplishment is the citizenship award that I was given for my age group at the show.  I won a watch for high individual judging.  It was very nice and an honor to receive because of the long tradition of those who won it before me.

Sooner State was an all-around success. Kanika got some good practice in the show ring to prepare her for Tulsa State Fair. She did well at the show.  She has settled back in nicely and is turned out with the beef cows right now.  She loves eating grass and spending the hot afternoons in the shade of the trees.  She enjoys taking an afternoon swim in the pond to keep cool.  She likes being turned out on pasture.

This month was a blast.  Our whole family likes Kanika and I think she likes living at our farm. 

The month of July has been a very slow inactive month.  We haven’t had any shows to go to this month.  I took Speck down to Mr. Emberson’s toward the end of June to be AI’d. She has a 17 day heat cycle and unfortunately it didn’t stick.  She has been turned out with his I-80 bull and should be coming back into heat soon if she isn’t bred.  She has lost weight since being out in the pasture but is looking pretty good.  Once we know that she is bred, I will bring her back home so that we can start preparing for the Tulsa State Fair.  I would like to thank you all for the opportunity to participate in the calf scramble.  I can’t believe that it is almost fair time.

June 2017 Reports

Merideth Behrens- Colbert FFA

During the month of May I finished up the eighth grade and got my class schedule for my 9th grade year.  I was elected as the reporter of Colbert FFA Chapter.  I have a busy summer, with FFA officer and cheerleader camps.  Not to mention I will be participating in the Shorthorn Jr. Nationals in Tulsa, OK during the week of 4th of July week.  I have a busy summer schedule planned, but working with my scramble heifer and other show calves during my summer break from school is first priority.

My typical morning starts at 7:15 in the morning at the barn.  The show calves are in their night runs waiting at the gate to come into their stalls in the barn.  The show calves have their own stalls, once I open the gates they walk right into their own pens including Jalynn.   Jalynn is always the first calf into he own pen and the first calf to be haltered.  I lead all of the calves over to the wash rack and blow out any dust or dirt in their hair and start rinsing the calves.  Once I complete rinsing, all the calves including Jalynn stay tied with their heads up for about an hour under the fans.  I will blow any excess water out of their hair and spray in a light coat of Revive Lite and brush it into their hair.  I will brush and comb on Jalynn for a couple minutes then practice showing her for about 30 minutes.  After working with Jalynn, I place her and the other show calves in their own pens and start feeding them.  All the show heifers, including Jalynn are fed a high protein and fiber diet too keep them from getting to over conditioned. Later in the afternoon, I start the process over again with blowing any dust or shavings out of their hair followed up with rinsing, and tie the show calves for an hour.  Finally I feed later in the afternoon, and turn out the calves into their runs.  I finish up in the evening by cleaning the manure out of the pens and get ready for the next morning.

During the month of May, I worked with Jalynn on loading and unloading from the show cattle trailer.  My dad parked the show calf trailer close to the barn so I could practice loading Jalynn and turn right around and unload her without her bulking.  After a week of practicing, Jalynn loads and unloads like a seasoned show calf.

I keep record of Jalynn’s rate of gain and from May 3rd too June 3rd, she gained 59 lbs. over 31 days.  Jalynn’s rate of gain is 1.90 lbs./day.  I learned from having a carcass steer this year, a rate of gain from 2-4 lbs./day is an exceptional.  Too keep from getting Jalynn to over condition, I have cut her back on the sweet feed and added filler type feeds like cotton seed hulls and Natural Fill.  In May, I was pushing her harder on sweet feed to get some condition since she was so green when I took possession.  I anticipate her appetite will be suppressed by the summer heat, plus I  am cutting her sweet feed intake down.  Free choice of grass hay is always available when she is turned out in the evening.   I feed twice a day, and at each feeding she is getting 10  lbs. of grain or show calf feed, 1 handful of natural fill(which is a silage) , and 1 scoop of cotton seed hulls.  I have learned from my previous show heifer projects I have a tendency to feed my show heifers  too much and they get over conditioned.  On occasion, I will have a difficult time getting my heifers bred as a result of having them over conditioned.  This time, I am taking extra caution with Jalynn not to over feed.

Towards the end of May, I did give her a dose of SafeGuard cattle dewormer since she has been grazing some in the evenings while she is in her run.

In closing, June will be a busy month preparing Jalynn for Shorthorn Jr. Nationals and I look forward to see how well she will compete on a national level.

Bryan Kile- Nowata FFA

The month of June was an exciting month.  On June 17th I left for McPeak’s Be a Champ Camp.  I enrolled late but was able to secure a spot for the second camp of the year.  Boy, am I glad that I did! 

We left our house at 8 a.m. and had a pretty easy drive until we got into the storms.  We had to pull over several times and once we were finally able to get back on the road we realized just how bad it was.  There was a hay ring and a barn that had gone across the highway not long before we passed through.  Once we arrived at the camp, the first thing we had to do was unload in the barn.  After we had unloaded the generator, chute, and show box we had to get the trailer parked under a shade tree so that we could get everything set up and get Speck bedded down.  My parents and I then headed to the dorms to get my luggage dropped off and I needed to purchase drinks because we forgot them.  Easier said than done when the whole town was without power.  We had lunch with friends and then it was time to work.  Everywhere we went we ran.  It didn’t matter if it was raining or we didn’t have electricity, we had a full schedule to follow and we worked through it all. 

While I was there I made several new friends.  I learned about new feeds and feed additives.  I also learned several new clipping techniques, more about showmanship, and the proper way to manage daily hair care.  On the last day they had a show and awards so that the parents could see what all we have learned.  My partner and I placed 4th in the fitting contest for our age group.  Overall, I had a blast and learned so much more than what I had gone in knowing.  I can’t wait to go back next year!  Once we got back home I took Speck back to Emberson Cattle (who I purchased her from) so that she could be AI’D.  Our next big show will be the Coffeyville ISFR.

Josh Crouch – Sequoyah FFA

This month has been a disaster! We had a tornado come through our property the first week in June. It completely destroyed my livestock barn as well as some home roof damage. The barn was gone. I knew my animals would not have survived, severely injured or nowhere in sight. To our surprise the animals were ok. They, the steer and two pigs, had walked over into a pen outside of the barn. This was definitely a miracle.

Thank goodness for good neighbors. I was able to take my steer to our neighbors and put our pigs in our shop. We worked almost every day for 2 ½ weeks to get the barn up. We were able to make some improvements and make it bigger. The animals are in their new barn and everything is going good.

I want to say a huge thank you to my parents. My parents are a huge part of my success. If it wasn’t for them I wouldn’t be able to participate in this program. They are my supporters. Don’t forget to thank your parents or your supporters.

We had a show camp at our school for our FFA group. We had a local Ag teacher to come in as a judge to point out what we needed to improve and give us feedback. I think this helped me a lot.

May 2017 Reports

Kolby Cundiff- Perkins-Tryon FFA

Since my last report, I have really enjoyed spending time with Clyde. He has been eating out of my hand and getting much more friendly. I can get him to eat a whole cup of feed out of my hand while I sit in the pen with him. I feed him 1lb. of feed, twice a day. I get feed for him at Mid America Farm Center in Bristow. We got 4 bags of Glen Martin’s Goat Feed, by ShowRite Feeds, so it will last a while before we need to go get feed again. Clyde is growing good on this feed and it was highly recommended from our cousins that also raise goats. I also give them a little bit of prairie hay every other evening. Since I have 2 goats in the same pen, and Bonnie is getting friendlier too, me and my dad thought it was time for a bigger pen. We moved them out of the lean-to and built a pen under some shade trees. We moved their pen over by our show goats from last year. We have a calf hut, that we had used in the past for my dairy heifers, that is now a goat house. We made the pen bigger and it has some grass so they can snack on it through the day.  I have been haltering them up and catching them every night. I also have started walking them. I walk them through the woods where we cleared trails for walking my show animals. We have a short and a long path. I had been walking them for a short lap, but now I am walking them a short lap and a long lap. They are doing great for just starting to walk. As they get more comfortable walking, I will start working on how to show them, like bracing and setting up Clyde. I will also start working on setting up Bonnie because I’m still going to show her in the spring.

I really appreciate the Calf Scramble sponsors that have allowed me this opportunity. I don’t think I would have Clyde, or Bonnie, if it weren’t for their generosity and interest in helping students like me.

Thank you!

Genevieve Russell- Crescent 4-H

Dear Tulsa State Fair Calf Scramble Sponsors,

School’s out!  Kitty and I have made a lot of progress in a short amount of time.  I’ve been preparing her for the show ring.  She is leading very well and is getting better about standing still and letting me set her legs.  I know that it will take constant work to get her “automatic” in proper feet setting for the shows. I have only been practicing with a rope halter.  My goal is to start working Kitty with a show halter soon because the feel of the chain underneath her chin will be different than her normal rope halter. I spend at least one hour daily working and bonding with my heifer. 

About a week ago, we enlarged her pen.  I helped tear down an old sow pen that was made of 12 cattle panels.  I worked over four hours tearing it down, including the t-posts.  Kitty likes the new space and freedom.  I am glad that she is tame enough that even with the new enlarged pen, I can still walk up with a halter and catch her.  Around the same time we enlarged the pen, Kitty gained a pen mate.  My little brother, Gabe, got a Jersey heifer to show.  She is about the same size as Kitty.  We halter them up each morning and evening to feed them separately.  I think this extra time with them while feeding has continued to make Kitty and I a good team. 

We will be taking our heifers to their first show tomorrow. It is the 4-State Dairy Days in Bentonville, Arkansas.  Because it is an out-of-state show, we had to take our heifers to the vet for a TB test.  Then we returned them 72 hours later for the test results, which were negative.  Dr. Bertrand also wrote our health papers.  The Crescent dairy exhibitors washed and clipped their heifers today at the ag farm.  Kitty did very well for her first bath and haircut.  She was calm in the washrack as well as the chute.  We prepared six heifers, which took about five hours.  While they were drying, we loaded the equipment and hay in the trailer.  Five students are exhibiting at the show.  It takes a lot of preparation time prior to the actual show.  Tomorrow morning, we will load our heifers and make a four-hour trip to Bentonville.  We are going to team up with some other exhibitors from Perkins and Adair.  I think our total number of animals is 29. 

I am really looking forward to this weekend.  I want to see how Kitty competes with other animals her age.  She will be in class three.  I don’t know how many will be in her class, but I hope to place in the top three.  I know that once we arrive in Bentonville, there will be a lot of work to do, but hopefully the work will pay off.  I also know that from talking to kids that have competed in Bentonville before, that there are a lot of fun activities to do in addition to the show itself.  I will update you about Bentonville in next month’s letter.  For now, Kitty and I say THANK YOU!

Trey Reece Perkins-Tryon FFA/Perkins 4-H

Most of the month of May Kanika, my Holstein heifer has been on wheat pasture with other dairy heifers and beef cattle.  We did gather all the cattle on May 22, sort them to go to different pastures and load some to be sold.  The dairy heifers were the first to be sorted off.  Kanika is now on Bermuda grass with other bred cattle.  She is extremely gentle and easy to handle.  She has lost some weight making her have more dairy character.  She was over conditioned when we bought her.  This is not a desirable trait when buying dairy heifers because they need to convert feed to milk not feed to fat when in milk production.  The average Holstein cow produces 75 pounds, or almost 9 gallons of milk per day.  Kanika is bred to be a show heifer, but will also be a productive dairy cow someday.  It is difficult to feed dairy heifers to grow but not put on extra flesh.  She is beginning to develop a nice uniform udder and getting more rib due to a growing calf inside. 

I plan on showing her at Sooner State Dairy Show in July at Stillwater.  This show has a long tradition of having the best dairy cattle in Oklahoma.  My brother and I will be exhibiting around 8 head of cattle including both Jersey and Holstein breeds.  Last year,  I had Reserve Supreme at the show with a Holstein cow that I have owned since she was born.  Kanika will show in the Fall Yearling class.  It is my goal to get her in a smaller pen and begin working with her on showing techniques.  I enjoy participating in showmanship competitions.  I have had some really good heifers to use for showmanship in the past, but presently I am struggling to find the right heifer to use.  I am hoping that with Kanika’s mild manner and gentle nature that she will make a good prospect for showmanship. Last year I won my age group and was second in the overall competition. 

Merideth Behrens- Colbert FFA

The proceeds from the Tulsa Calf Scramble I used to purchase Lot 1, Sull Mystic Jalynn 6691d, a dual registered Shorthorn Plus/Chianina heifer that will be a great addition to my own purebred Shorthorn cow/calf operation.  I purchased my show heifer from Sullivan Farms on March 19 from Willouby online sales.  I made arrangements to have my heifer delivered to Madill, Ok and I picked her up on March 24th.  Loading her on the trailer in Madill, she was quite stirred up and was very nervous. Once we got her to the barn, we weighed her and she weighed 615 lbs. on March 24th.  I pushed her to the breaking pen where she called home for the next two weeks. 

After a couple days of letting her calm down and get settled into her new home, I started the halter breaking process.   I figured she would be very difficult to halter break given she was very wild when I picked her up.  I loaded her in the working chute and placed a rope halter on her to drag.  I then placed her back in her breaking pen and tied her to the panel.  I was quite surprised she didn’t fight to be tied. I would leave her tied up with her head up while I worked around the barn, when I left the barn I would tie her low so she could lay down.  After a couple of weeks of tying her I decided to try and rub her belly with the show stick.  She didn’t budge or kick at it. She liked it and it really did help in the halter breaking process.   I took a deep breath and grabbed the end of the rope and pulled the knot loose.  She didn’t budge it was like we were both holding our breath to see who was going to give in first.  My heifer looked at me and I looked at her and she decided she wanted to enter the rodeo as a rank bull.  I held on tight, kept my cool, and spoke to her with a confident tone that she knew I was the boss.  Within 10 minutes of feeling like I was a bullfighter she chilled out and let me hold the halter as well as rub her belly.  We had to build a trust relationship, it had to start with my heifer knowing I was in control and I wasn’t going to be a threat to her.  Within a week of our rodeo and after a long week of practicing setting up, going to the wash rack every night, and long evenings of spending time together we were ready to hit a jackpot show. 

On April 8th, I took my heifer to her first show, the Van Zandt County Fair in Canton, Texas.  The morning of the jackpot I was a tad bit worried she would have the reckless attitude she did the day I picked her up.  She proved me wrong and she was show ready. She really showed me she was a team player and she had a desire to win, just like me.  She walked into the show ring with class, she kept her head up, and practically walked into show profile on her own.  She did not bobble once, this made showing her so smooth and easy.  There were five other heifers her age in our class that were equally as good as Mystic Jalynn.  The judge had us walk the circle 3 times and set up each time. Once again she was amazing. Then it happened, the judge picked us to win our class, he then chose us as Shorthorn Plus Breed Champion.  We fell short in the Supreme Drive to a heavy bred Simmental  (that rightfully deserved to win). I did not let that get me down and I certainly did not want her to feel like I was disappointed in her. I rubbed her neck and scratched her ears and told her how proud I was of her.

Since that jackpot,  Mystic  Jalynn and I practice daily. She is on a great routine and has acclimated to our good ole Oklahoma climate.  She has a great appetite for the show heifer feed ration.   I weighed her on 5/3/17 and she weighed in at 697 lbs., with an average daily gain of 2 lbs./day. I anticipate her daily gain will go down with our warmer temperature approaching.    I am absolutely in LOVE with my heifer.  I have the Calf Scramble Sponsors and the Tulsa State Fair and Rodeo to thank for giving me the additional money to purchase the next Supreme Grand Champion….

Bryan Kile- Nowata FFA

This past month of May has been a slow month for me.  We’ve had only one show and plenty of practice.  She has gotten good at stepping into place and has slowed down on her eating.  She likes when I open the gates and let her run with the other show calves.

On May 27th we went to our local show called the Dean McKee Memorial Jackpot Show.  We got there in the morning and set stuff up at the trailer and bedded down under fans.  I washed her at the house beforehand so I didn’t have to wait in line at the show

I got 3rd in my class of commercial with her weighing 725.  We didn’t place in showmanship.  There were about 16 kids in the ring all at once so it was very crowded.  After the show we loaded up and came home.  I rinsed her off and turned her back out in her pen.  After that was all done she went out and took a nap under the shade tree.  I look forward to the month of June because I will be going to McPeaks “Be a Champ” camp for the first time on the 17th through the 20th.

Trey Reece- Perkins-Tryon FFA

Through the month of June my Holstein heifer, Kanika has been on grass pasture.  She was considerably over conditioned when I purchased her.  Over conditioned is a term used for dairy cattle that have too much body fat.  Kanika is in much better body condition for a dairy show heifer now.  She is receiving 6 pounds of 20 percent cattle cubes a day and plenty of green grass.  As she is getting closer to calving it is best that her body condition is right for a first calf heifer.  Holstein calves can be very large and it is best that the heifer is not over weight because it will cause calving problems. I am looking forward to Kanika's calf being born.  I am hoping that it is a red Holstein calf. I do not have any red Holsteins, all of mine are black and white in color. 

She is extremely gentle and easy to work with.  Her first show will be in July at Sooner State Dairy Show.  I have exhibited cattle at this show since I was 9 years old.  My grandfather and my mother both showed at Sooner State Dairy Show when they were in FFA.  Last year I had Reserve Supreme of the show with my Holstein cow.  That means that the judge considered my cow the second best dairy animal of the whole show.  That was a very big honor to receive.  I am going to show my cow again and several Jerseys plus Kanika.  

It takes a lot of preparation to show dairy cattle.  We will start tying up and leading our cattle several times a week so that they are well behaved in the show ring. My brother and I work together to lead our cattle.  We also tag team clipping our cattle before the show.  We start by putting them in the clipping chute. We use a small set of clippers for heads and feet and a larger set for bodies.  My brother and I work together to clip all our show cattle to prepare them for the show ring.  We end up washing them several times to get them in the best show shape as possible.  It is a lot of work to show cattle but I enjoy the competition and being with my friends that also show.  I am happy that I have Kanika to show and someday I will be showing her heifer calf.  Buying Kanika was a two for one purchase.

April 2017 Reports
Kolby Cundiff Perkins-Tryon FFA

On Friday, April 21st, I started my 2017 goat adventure. My original plan with the calf scramble voucher was to get a dairy heifer to show and to breed. I still show dairy, but decided I didn’t want to get another one, because I already have two. This past fall I wanted to get a goat for the spring show, just to see if I would like to show them.

I had really good luck at the local and county shows! I won showmanship in my age division and made it to the premium sale. Not only did I have good luck, I really enjoyed them. To me, they are like a dog, you can run and play with them and it’s always funny when they try to eat your clothes. They are also very cute, even when they get older. 

With all the fun and luck I had, I made an executive decision to get a goat with my calf scramble voucher. I went to a wether sale at Pfeiffer Farms in Orlando, OK. They are a local show goat breeder. We were referred to this breeder by our cousins, who also raise and show goats. I got to bid on him myself and was so excited when I had the final bid. He cost $1200, but thanks to the calf scramble sponsors, I only had to pay 400 dollars out of my pocket. 

He is a brown and white goat. He is brown from the shoulders up with the exception of a white spot on the right side if his head. He also has a brown spot on his front left leg and his back right leg.  We didn’t bring a trailer to the sale that night, so we had to wait to pick him up the next day. I had a 4-H speech contest the next morning and couldn’t wait to get done, so I could go get my new goat. When we arrived we loaded him up in an oversized pet taxi.  The Pfeiffer family said that goats will eat and grow better if they have a friend, so they sent a doe goat home with us to raise with him. We really thanked them and they wished us luck and we were on our way home with two goats. 

When we arrived home we started building a pen. We made it narrow so they could be easily caught. We put an old dog house in the pen for when it rains. We put a panel over top of the house so they couldn’t jump on top of it and break it. I wanted to get them named and I decided on Bonnie and Clyde. Before I even start on walking and bracing Clyde, I have to get him friendly. I put feed in my hand and slowly try to pet him when he comes close to eat it. Every day I get off the bus I go in the pen and sit. I have a stump that I sit on every day. Clyde is getting more friendly, but Bonnie is still pretty spooky. I can now go and pet him gently. The best place to pet him is behind the ears. Sometimes he will chew on my sweatshirt. I change their water every day and feed them. 

We feed him a pound of Showrite feed, twice a day. I can already tell he is growing.  The other day I went out and did some homework with him. I almost had to tell my teacher that my goat ate my homework. I can already tell he is going to be a little ornery, but I like the goats like that. I can’t wait to see what this next month may bring. I can already tell I’ll be walking him by my next report. 

Thank you sponsors!

Genevieve Russel – Crescent 4-H
Dear Sponsors,

I am happy to report to you that I purchased a Milking Shorthorn heifer on April 14.  Her name is Kitty.  I don’t know her registered name yet, as I haven’t received the papers in the mail.  My Ag teacher traveled to Rosebud, Arkansas to Rosebud Farms to pick her out.  Her purchase price was $1350.  She is mostly red in color with some white markings.

Mr. Strain and his family milk over 400 cows.  The main breeds he has are Milking Shorthorns, Ayrshires, Jerseys, and Holsteins.  Kitty was born in September of 2016.  She is already weaned and eating feed as well as hay.  I am currently halter breaking her.  

My first show will be in June.  I am really looking forward to showing Kitty.  She is coming around with the halter breaking, but I know I still have many hours of working with her on getting her showring ready.  

For now, we have built a small pen with a shed that was already at my farm.  Ms. Jennings has told me that we will need to expand the pen once she has tamed down.  I also purchased my first 500 pounds of feed from Livestock Nutrition Center.  The Crescent dairy exhibitors have a ration mixed there specifically for dairy cattle.  Kitty has taken to the new feed and is eating about seven pounds per day.  I also am offering her free choice hay. 

I’m very excited about having my new heifer and look forward to sending you reports on her monthly.  Thank you again for being a generous sponsor for the Tulsa State Fair Calf Scramble.

Sincerely,

Genevieve Russell 

Merideth Behrens  Colbert FFA
The proceeds from the Tulsa Calf Scramble I used to purchase Lot 1, Sull Mystic Jalynn 6691d, a dual registered Shorthorn Plus/Chianina heifer that will be a great addition to my own purebred Shorthorn cow/calf operation.  I purchased my show heifer from Sullivan Farms on March 19 from Willouby online sales.  I made arrangements to have my heifer delivered to Madill, Ok and I picked her up on March 24th.  Loading her on the trailer in Madill, she was quite stirred up and was very nervous. Once we got her to the barn, we weighed her and she weighed 615 lbs. on March 24th.  I pushed her to the breaking pen where she called home for the next two weeks.  

After a couple days of letting her calm down and get settled into her new home, I started the halter breaking process.   I figured she would be very difficult to halter break given she was very wild when I picked her up.  I loaded her in the working chute and placed a rope halter on her to drag.  I then placed her back in her breaking pen and tied her to the panel.  I was quite surprised she didn’t fight to be tied. I would leave her tied up with her head up while I worked around the barn, when I left the barn I would tie her low so she could lay down.  After a couple of weeks of tying her I decided to try and rub her belly with the show stick.  She didn’t budge or kick at it. She liked it and it really did help in the halter breaking process.   I took a deep breath and grabbed the end of the rope and pulled the knot loose.  She didn’t budge it was like we were both holding our breath to see who was going to give in first.  My heifer looked at me and I looked at her and she decided she wanted to enter the rodeo as a rank bull.  I held on tight, kept my cool, and spoke to her with a confident tone that she knew I was the boss.  Within 10 minutes of feeling like I was a bullfighter she chilled out and let me hold the halter as well as rub her belly.  We had to build a trust relationship, it had to start with my heifer knowing I was in control and I wasn’t going to be a threat to her.  Within a week of our rodeo and after a long week of practicing setting up, going to the wash rack every night, and long evenings of spending time together we were ready to hit a jackpot show.  

On April 8th, I took my heifer to her first show, the Van Zandt County Fair in Canton, Texas.  The morning of the jackpot I was a tad bit worried she would have the reckless attitude she did the day I picked her up.  She proved me wrong and she was show ready. She really showed me she was a team player and she had a desire to win, just like me.  She walked into the show ring with class, she kept her head up, and practically walked into show profile on her own.  She did not bobble once, this made showing her so smooth and easy.  There were five other heifers her age in our class that were equally as good as Mystic Jalynn.  The judge had us walk the circle 3 times and set up each time. Once again she was amazing. Then it happened, the judge picked us to win our class, he then chose us as Shorthorn Plus Breed Champion.  We fell short in the Supreme Drive to a heavy bred Simmental  (that rightfully deserved to win). I did not let that get me down and I certainly did not want her to feel like I was disappointed in her. I rubbed her neck and scratched her ears and told her how proud I was of her. 

Since that jackpot,  Mystic  Jalynn and I practice daily. She is on a great routine and has acclimated to our good ole Oklahoma climate.  She has a great appetite for the show heifer feed ration.   I weighed her on 5/3/17 and she weighed in at 697 lbs., with an average daily gain of 2 lbs./day. I anticipate her daily gain will go down with our warmer temperature approaching.    I am absolutely in LOVE with my heifer.  I have the Calf Scramble Sponsors and the Tulsa State Fair and Rodeo to thank for giving me the additional money to purchase the next Supreme Grand Champion…

Trey Reece Perkins-Tryon FFA
After a long search I finally found a heifer.  Her name is Kanika.  I purchased her at the Oklahoma State Holstein Sale in Stillwater, OK during the Southern National Holstein and Jersey Show.  She was consigned by the University of Missouri.  Her sire is Maple-Downs-IG Atwood, he is a Holstein bull known for his ability to produce show cattle.  Atwood is sired by Braedale Goldwyn; he has sired more All-Americans than any other Holstein bull.  Kanika’s mother is U-MD Durable Kayla-Red.  She is sired by Ronnelee Durable.  Kanika has an excellent pedigree.  She is bred to gender selected Mr. Apples Diamondback.  Her calf is due October 25th.  Kanika seems to be very gentle.  She led onto the trailer well.  She is currently on wheat pasture with other cattle.  I can walk out into the middle of the field and she comes running. I feel certain she is going to be easy to handle and show.  

 

 

February 2017 Reports

Trey Reece – Perkins-Tryon 4-H
I truly enjoyed my night at the rodeo.  My best friend and I were both chosen to compete.  We had fun sitting in our box seats at the rodeo together.  It was really awesome to get introduced in the arena in front of everybody.

I am pretty sure the calves were Brahman crosses.  They were very fast.  I was hoping for something like a Jersey.  I am thankful for the rodeo clowns and staff for helping me corner the calf I caught.  Once I caught it dragging it was not too bad.  I was the first to the circle.  I cheered my best friend on, hoping he would catch a calf too.  He was the very last one to get to the circle.  It was hard to not help him. As we watched the rest of the rodeo many strangers congratulated us. 

I am extremely glad we both get to do this program together. We plan on showing our heifers together at local, county and state shows.  

Thank you so much for sponsoring this program. I can't wait to find a new heifer to purchase and show.  I enjoy showing at Tulsa State Fair with my friends.  We always have a great time.  Your sponsorship is greatly appreciated.

Kolby Cundiff – Perkins-Tryon FFA
Thank you for donating money to the Tulsa State Fair Calf Scramble.  I will use the money wisely to buy a dairy heifer that I can show for an FFA project.  It will help prepare me for my future agricultural career possibilities.  I am looking for a dairy heifer to add to the two heifers I already own and show.  

One of my best friends and I both competed in the contest.  We both caught a calf.  We enjoyed being able to do the calf scramble together and attending the rodeo.   We look forward to showing our new heifers together at the Tulsa State Fair.  

I hope you continue to donate to this program so that other 4-H and FFA members can have this awesome experience. Thanks again for making this opportunity possible. 

Bryan Kile – Nowata FFA
Hello, my name is Bryan Kile and I would like to thank all of the people who sponsored the Calf Scramble at the Tulsa State Fair. Your contribution to the calf scramble has helped many kids out, including me on purchasing a show project. If it wasn’t for you guys, the calf scramble wouldn’t be possible and kids wouldn’t get to experience all of the thrills that come along with learning how to take care of and show your animal!

With the $800.00 certificate from the calf scramble I was able to purchase a Chi heifer. She is black with a white belly and one little white dot on her forehead. She was born on June 20th, 2016.  Her Sire is ECAX Final Act 2834Z and her Dam is ECAX  Chopper/Diva 4971. 

I am ready to get her out and see what she can do! She will be really competitive once I can get her eating good, she only weighs 500 pounds right now but is starting to gain day by day.
Once again I would like to say thank you for helping me out on the purchase of my new show heifer!

Tomi Fullerton – Sequoyah FFA
I would like to thank all of the sponsors of the calf scramble at the 2016 Tulsa State Fair. The money that I have received has helped my buy a simmental heifer for the upcoming Tulsa State Fair in 2017. She is doing great! Your generosity is greatly appreciated.

Ashlynn Vargas – Pryor 4-H
I would like to take this time to thank you for the opportunity to be a part of the 2016 calf scramble. I would plan to use the money to buy a new show heifer that I will show at the Tulsa State fair, and then add to my herd.

Abbigayle Vargas – Pryor FFA
Thank you to all the sponsors who allowed me this opportunity to compete in the calf scramble. With this I am going to purchase a show heifer that I can show at the 2017 Tulsa State Fair and hopefully do well with. It was a great experience and I want to thank you again for this opportunity.

July 2016 Reports

Adam Erickson - Haskell FFA

This month has been slow and hot. Trying to battle the heat to keep Diva cool. By rinsing her every day and putting her under fans to grow more hair for Tulsa State Fair. I had to back Diva off her feed a little bit because Diva was getting to fat and pushing the other heifer away from the feed. Diva likes her feed. I decided to separate Diva from the other heifer, because she was eating too much and not letting the other heifer eat.  I am ready to take her to my county show in September to get her out and see how she reacts to things and not freak out. So when I take her to Tulsa State Fair hopefully she will be fine. But I am looking forward to bring Diva to Tulsa this year and bring her back to Tulsa State Fair next year for her last show.

 

Monthly Expense: $86.40

 

Marissa Jennings - Adair FFA

This has been a very hot and busy month for both Addie and me. I don't think I mentioned it, but even though I named my heifer Adelina, her real registered name is SS Debs 966.  Adelina fits her lots better.  First off, we didn't catch her in time to A-I her the first week of July.  So she is visiting in Stillwater in order to, hopefully, get her bred this cycle.  I expect her back any day.  We took her and several other dairy animals to the Sooner State Dairy Show, July 21-July 23.  It was really hot on those days, and that made it hard on the animals and everyone, but we made it.  There was a total of 22 Brown Swiss heifers that showed, so some good ones.  Addie showed in the Summer Yearling class and won 3rd place.  The judge commented that she liked her breed characteristics, but she would like more width between the pins.  I was really proud of the way she showed and and how well she acted in both showing and getting her washed and clipped for showing.  I 'm still feeding her about 1 1/4 cans of  20% creep and all the hay she wants each day.

My school begins August 11, so I know this is going to be another busy month.  Our Mayes County Fair is September 8-12.  That isn't very far off, so I know there will be more work to do.  I am hoping Addie does really good in this show.  It won't be long until Tulsa State Fair!

Monthly Expense: $45.80

 

Reid Kile - Nowata 4-H
July has been a hot month!  I have been wetting my heifer down so that she stays  cooler.  We haven’t gone to any shows.  I have been preparing for Coffeyville in the meantime.  

 

This past week we loaded all of our heifers and steers up and took them to the vet to get their health papers.  We also took a blood sample to SEK Genetics and found out that Butter is bred.  We AI’D her on June 13 so she is due to calve on March 21st, 2017.

 

We have had to change her feed up a bit.  Right now she is getting 3 scoops of Full Range, 2 scoops of Fat Calf, 1 scoop of oats, ½ of a cup of Powerfuel, and a cup of Surechamp.  She gets this twice a day.  If she eats all of that then I will give her more Full Range.  She is weighing in at 1095 pounds.  

 

 I cannot wait to show her at Tulsa!  

 

Monthly Expense: $174.20

 

Jared Nicholson – Skiatook FFA
July has been a busy month for me.  So I have been getting up early in the morning to workout Zeke.  He is beginning to look better and gained enough weight that I am able to start treading him on the treadmill three times a week.  I plan on showing him at the end of the month at the Tulsa County Free Fair.   

 

Monthly Expense: $110.00

 

Samantha Pearce - Porum FFA

The month of July was great with Mavis. I'm still working with her, and she's still doing terrific. She's growing so quickly which gets me excited. Her hair is coming back slowly but surely which also gets me excited, just knowing that show season is right around the corner. Ready to see Mavis take on the ring this coming fall!

 

Monthly Expense: $122.75

 

Dalton Sisson - Weatherford FFA
Since the last report I have changed heifers.  Behrie was having back troubles, so the vendor traded calves out with me. The new calf is named Moonshine.  She was very easy to break and was in the barn within a few days of first putting a halter on her.  I will be taking her to several small town fairs in the next couple months and working with her every day. She has a lot of hair and seems to be growing more and more each day.  She is a neat designed heifer that is real feminine fronted and extremely sound.  I wash and dry her in the mornings and she stays in front of the port a cools during the day, then rinse her in the evenings.  I am looking forward to getting her in the show ring to see how she gets along.  I practice sticking on her every other evening, to help prepare her for the ring and she does a pretty good job of setting herself up by now.  I think she will do extremely well in the show ring. 

 

Monthly Expense: $146.94

 

Hunter Suntken - Sequoyah FFA

It's been another great month with my calf scramble pig. My gilt has continued to grow and look better and better each day. She has also stayed healthy and continued to eat through this hot summer. This next month I will be going to my first show with her for this show year. I can't wait to see how well she does and how I can continue to work with her to make her a better show gilt. 

June 2016 Reports

Adam Erickson - Haskell FFA
In my last report I said I was going to Chickasha, well things came up again and I didn't get to go. Because Diva was the only one going and it was going to be hot and didn't want to take one calf down to Chickasha. But the next week I took diva to McPeak's cattle camp to get her out and see how she would react to the trailer ride and all of the noise . Then I clipped her and fitted her and she react with no problem at all.I was glad that she didn't blow up or act stupid so I was pretty happy. After that I have been working with Diva and trying to get all the red hair off my black animal. I am looking forward to taking her to some shows to get her out to see what people say and were she might place at the show . When I get her to Tulsa I am hopping that when Tulsa rolls around she will be ready for the show and for  people to see her. Hope by this fall when shows roll around,  she will have the show life down so when I take her to Tulsa she will be happy,content, she will eat, and cooperate for me at Tulsa and for future  shows.

Monthly Expense: $86.40

Marissa Jennings - Adair FFA
This month, Addie has been doing quite well.  She's a year old now, and we are watching her in order to breed her this month.  I had her TB tested at the end of last month before we took her and five other cattle to 4-State Dairy Show at Bentonville, Arkansas.  This was Addie's first show, and I was nervous about how she would act.  Thankfully, she acted really well when I washed, clipped and did her top line for the show.  I washed and clipped six cattle on Saturday.  That was a job!  On Sunday, the actual show took place.  Since there was no Brown Swiss class, she showed in the Commercial heifer class.  She won 1st in her class!  She went back in for champion, but I won the commercial champion with another heifer.  I was proud of the way Addie showed at Bentonville.       

Even though 4-State doesn't pay much, it was really nice experience.  Now, in July, we are getting ready for Sooner State in Stillwater.  Summer is a really busy time for me!

Monthly Expense: $320.60

Reid Kile - Nowata 4-H
June has been a slow month.  I didn’t go to any shows.  We bred Butter on June 13th to the bull “Sweet Baby James”. Butters eye is back to normal finally after hitting it on the L bracket that is on the chute.

I just got back from vacation with my family.  We went to Cheyenne, Wyoming first and then stopped to see the Oregon Trail ruts and then on to see Fort Laramie.  After that we drove up to South Dakota to see Mount Rushmore, Deadwood, and then stayed in Sioux Falls.   It was a blast.   We got back Saturday, July 2nd.  I am back to doing regular chores now.

I have been bringing in the steers and heifers so that I can wet them down, tie them up, and put them under the fans to grow hair.  I wet them down 3 times a day to keep them wet.  We are preparing for the Coffeyville fair and rodeo that is in August.

Monthly Expense: $137.20

Jared Nicholson – Skiatook FFA
June has

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